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US Regulations

Arizona

Arizona has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Arizona bill was enacted 26 Jan. 2006 and became 1 Jan. 2007.

Arkansas

Arkansas has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and asks (but does not mandate) physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Arkansas bill is unusual because it also establishes a program where taxpayers can contribute a portion of their state income tax refunds towards the establishment of a statewide cord blood banking program (both public and private) at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). The Arkansas bill was enacted 30 March 2007 and became effective 30 June 2008.

California

California has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and asks (but does not mandate) physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The California bill was enacted 26 Sept. 2006 and became effective 26 Sept. 2006. 
More importantly, on 30 Sept. 2010 California passed Assembly Bill 52 to raise funding for a state wide cord blood donation program by raising the cost of birth certificate copies $2 apiece.  The bill was a personal passion of sponsor Anthony Portantino, who worked for years to make it a reality.
California is a particularly good state for collecting cord blood donations because of its ethnic diversity; in the state capital of Sacramento, 20% of all births are registered as "mixed race".  The California cord blood donations will be processed in a laboratory at the University of California at Davis, which already has a strong  program in stem cell research.

Colorado

Colorado has state legislation around cord blood education that only requires hospitals and obstetricians to distribute information about public donation of cord blood.  The Colorado bill also establishes the Adult Stem Cells Cure Fund.  The fund is an optional donation on state tax returns, and the money raised goes to support the expansion of public cord blood banking efforts in Colorado.  The Colorado bill was enacted 3 June 2008 and became effective 1 Sept. 2008.

Connecticut

Connecticut has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Connecticut bill was enacted 8 July 2009 and became effective 1 July 2009.

Two years later, the Connecticut House of Representatives approved another bill to create a state public bank of cord blood donations.  The 2011 State Bill 152 was approved 8 June and signed into Public Act 11-160 on 13 July 2011.  The 2011 bill amends the cord blood education provisions of the 2009 bill to create a Connecticut Umbilical Cord Blood Collection Board of 8 appointees to oversee the program.  The program will be run jointly by Yale-New Haven Hospital and the University of Connecticut John Dempsey Hospital.  The bill specifies deadlines of 1 Oct. 2011 to appoint the Collection Board and 1 July 2012 to launch the program.  It remains to be seen whether this program will be able to raise enough funding to operate.

Florida

Florida has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  Florida was the second state to explicitly endorse the use of educational materials from Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation.  The Florida bill was enacted 17 June 2011 and became effective 1 July 2011.

Georgia

Georgia has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Georgia bill was enacted 24 May 2007 and became effective 30 June 2009.

Illinois

Illinois has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and encourages prenatal caregivers to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Illinois bill was enacted 14 Aug. 2007 and became effective 1 Jan. 2008.

Actually, Illinois has two complimentary bills that both passed the state legislature in 2007.  The House Bill HB642  is the cord blood education bill that endorses all cord blood banking options.  In addition, Senate Bill SB19 amends the Department of Public Health Powers and Duties Law.  Subject to appropriation (of funds), SB19: directs the Department to establish a network of (public) cord blood stem cell banks, sets forth requirements and duties of donor banks, and creates an advisory committee to advise the Department concerning administration of the network. The Senate Bill was enacted 24 Aug. 2007 and became effective immediately.

Indiana

Indiana House Bill 1172 of 2008 authorizes the Secretary of Human Services to form an Indiana non-profit corporation that will collect cord blood donations, plus donations of other perinatal tissues. The Indiana legislation is very unusual in that it explicitly calls for the collection of "other perinatal tissues".  However, the state never formed a non-profit to collect them. Since 2010, an independent non-profit has been operating in many Indiana hospitals to collect donations of cord blood and birth tissues for distribution to cord blood banks and/or itssue banks.

Indiana Senate Bill 315 of 2016 requires hospitals and obstetricians to disseminate information about donation only of "postnatal fluid" and "postnatal tissue". The Indiana bill was enacted 22 March 2016 and became effective 1 July 2016.

Louisiana

Louisiana has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Louisiana bill was enacted 12 June 2008 and became effective 15 Aug. 2008.

Maryland

Maryland has state legislation around cord blood education that only requires hospitals and obstetricians to distribute information about public donation of cord blood.  The Maryland bill was enacted 2 May 2006 and became effective 1 Oct. 2006.  


The Maryland education bill had been sponsored by Maryland State Senator Nancy Jacobs.  At the time, no hospitals in Maryland collected cord blood donations.  That changed in Fall 2010, when two hospitals in Baltimore began collecting cord blood donations.  But there were still no hospitals in Maryland that offered cord blood transplants to adults (except for NIH, where the patient must participate in a clinical trial).  That may change thanks to another bill sponsored by Minority Leader Jacobs and signed into law on 19 May 2011: it would make private funding and grants available to encourage hospitals to offer cord blood transplants to adults.

The Maryland Catholic Conference eagerly seeks public banks willing to partner with them in cord blood collection programs at Maryland's Catholic hospitals.  Please contact them if you can provide support for that effort.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts has state legislation around cord blood education that is two-tiered.  Hospitals are required to inform all pregnant women in the 3rd trimester of the opportunity to donate cord blood.  There is also a public education program run by the Dept. of Health that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and asks (but does not mandate) physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Massachusetts bill was enacted 30 May 2005 and became effective immediately.
 

Michigan

Michigan has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Michigan bill was enacted 4 Jan. 2007 and becomes effective "upon determination of sufficient funds" for development of educational materials.

Missouri

Missouri has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  Missouri was the third state to explicitly endorse the use of educational materials from Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation.  The Missouri bill was enacted 8 July 2011 and became effective 1 Oct. 2011.

New Jersey

New Jersey was the first state to have a state wide program of collecting cord blood donations for the public.  It was established by executive order of then-Governor Codey on 18 Oct. 2005 and funded with $350,000 over two years.  As of 26 May 2007, the program became known as the "New Jersey Cord Blood Bank" and was consolidated under Community Blood Services in Allendale, NJ (press release).
New Jersey has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The New Jersey bill was enacted 7 Jan. 2008 and became effective 7 Apr. 2008.
By 2008, NJCBB was collecting cord blood from 25 hospitals in New Jersey, 16 hospitals in New York,  2 hospitals in Delaware, and 1 hospital in Rhode Island. 
However, in 2009 it became clear that NJ was running one of the largest state deficits in the nation and could not continue to support the public banking program.  In 2010, NJCBB eliminated all of their collection sites in NY and cut back to 5 staffed collection sites in NJ at hospitals that have large fractions of minority births which meet the criteria for reimbursement by a HRSA grant.  They continued to collect from 1 hospital in RI, 2 in DE via a charity partnership, and 2 in MD via a charity partnership.
Since 2011, the NJ list is down to 3 hospitals, but the sites in RI, DE, and MD continue because the partnership support makes them affordable.

New Mexico

New Mexico has state legislation around cord blood education that only mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about public donation of cord blood.  The New Mexico bill was enacted 19 Mar. 2005 and became effective 1 Jan. 2006.

New York

New York had state legislation around cord blood education that followed the Institute of Medicine guidelines and asked (but did not mandate) physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The New York bill was enacted 7 Aug. 2007 and became effective 7 Feb. 2008. This bill was later repealed.

North Carolina

North Carolina has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The North Carolina bill was enacted 8 June 2009 and became effective 8 June 2009.

North Dakota

North Dakota does not have any state legislation around cord blood education, but their Dept. of Health has officially adopted the educational materials from Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation

Ohio

Ohio has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Ohio Dept. of Health has officially adopted the educational materials from Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation.  The Ohio bill was enacted 31 Mar. 2010 and became effective 1 July 2010.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Oklahoma bill was enacted 15 May 2008 and became effective 1 July 2008.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Pennsylvania bill was enacted 3 April 2008 and became effective 2 June 2008.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Rhode Island bill was enacted 27 June 2008 and became effective 27 June 2008.

Tennessee

Tennessee has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking. The Tennessee Dept. of Health has officially adopted the educational materials from Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation. The Tennessee bill was enacted 31 Mar. 2010 and became effective 1 July 2010.

Texas

Texas has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Texas Dept. of Health is also tasked to to educate the public about programs that offer free family cord blood storage when the family has an existing medical need.  The Texas bill was enacted 18 May 2007 and became effective 1 Jan. 2008.

Virginia

Virginia was the first state to pass legislation where the bill itself explicitly endorses the use of educational materials from Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation.  Virginia has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Virginia bill was enacted 9 Mar. 2010 and became effective 1 July 2010.

Washington

Washington has state legislation around cord blood education that follows the Institute of Medicine guidelines and mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about ALL forms of cord blood banking.  The Washington bill was enacted 18 Mar. 2008 and became effective 1 July 2010.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin has state legislation around cord blood education that only mandates/encourages physicians to educate expectant parents about public donation of cord blood.  The Wisconsin bill was enacted 15 Dec. 2005 and became effective 30 Dec. 2005.